Category Archive: 5) Global Macro

Dicky birds: the next pandemic?

The scars of the covid pandemic are still raw, but now a virus spreading (https://www.economist.com/science-and-technology/2024/07/17/h5n1-avian-flu-could-cause-a-human-pandemic?utm_campaign=a.io&utm_medium=audio.podcast.np&utm_source=theintelligence&utm_content=discovery.content.anonymous.tr_shownotes_na-na_article&utm_term=sa.listeners) among farm animals could leap to humans. Could bird flu become the next pandemic? White women...

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Veep show: America meets J.D. Vance

J.D. Vance was largely unknown in American politics until Donald Trump picked him (https://www.economist.com/united-states/2024/07/16/jd-vance-is-now-the-heir-apparent-to-the-maga-movement?utm_campaign=a.io&utm_medium=audio.podcast.np&utm_source=theintelligence&utm_content=discovery.content.anonymous.tr_shownotes_na-na_article&utm_term=sa.listeners) as his running-mate for vice-president. Last night he gave his first speech to the...

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Food for thought: raising the world’s IQ

If you don’t have enough food in the first 1,000 days of your life, your brain may never reach its full potential. Our correspondent discusses what better nutrition (https://www.economist.com/leaders/2024/07/11/how-to-raise-the-worlds-iq?utm_campaign=a.io&utm_medium=audio.podcast.np&utm_source=theintelligence&utm_content=discovery.content.anonymous.tr_shownotes_na-na_article&utm_term=sa.listener) would mean for the world. Undersea...

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Lost in stagnation? Japan’s economic paradox

After decades of torpor, is Japan recovering its dynamism (https://www.economist.com/asia/2024/07/01/japans-mind-bending-bento-box-economics?utm_campaign=a.io&utm_medium=audio.podcast.np&utm_source=theintelligence&utm_content=discovery.content.anonymous.tr_shownotes_na-na_article&utm_term=sa.listeners)? Our correspondent turns to an ancient bento box merchant to test Japan’s economic future. A new study shows how few therapies...

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An assassination attempt: what next for America?

After the shocking attempt to kill (https://www.economist.com/united-states/2024/07/14/donald-trump-survives-an-apparent-assassination-attempt?utm_campaign=a.io&utm_medium=audio.podcast.np&utm_source=theintelligence&utm_content=discovery.content.anonymous.tr_shownotes_na-na_article&utm_term=sa.listeners) former President Donald Trump, how will America respond...

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An officer and a gen AI: the future of war

Artificial intelligence is already making a difference (https://www.economist.com/briefing/2024/06/20/how-ai-is-changing-warfare?utm_campaign=a.io&utm_medium=audio.podcast.np&utm_source=theintelligence&utm_content=discovery.content.anonymous.tr_shownotes_na-na_article&utm_term=sa.listeners) in the theatre of war, and more involvement will certainly come. That raises a host of thorny ethical issues. In some cases, scientists just...

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Bidin’: will Joe go or no?

Democrats’ worried murmurs have become public statements. Polls give Donald Trump a widening lead. Why won’t President Biden make way (https://www.economist.com/united-states/2024/07/10/joe-biden-is-failing-to-silence-calls-that-he-step-aside?utm_campaign=a.io&utm_medium=audio.podcast.np&utm_source=theintelligence&utm_content=discovery.content.anonymous.tr_shownotes_na-na_article&utm_term=sa.listeners) for a younger successor? Off...

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Change of heart surgeon: Iran’s reformist president

Masoud Pezeshkian rode to victory on a promise of reforms that Iran’s people seem desperately to want (https://www.economist.com/middle-east-and-africa/2024/07/06/a-reformer-wanting-a-nuclear-deal-with-america-wins-irans-election?utm_campaign=a.io&utm_medium=audio.podcast.np&utm_source=theintelligence&utm_content=discovery.content.anonymous.tr_shownotes_na-na_article&utm_term=sa.listeners). Will the former heart surgeon be permitted...

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Holey alliance: NATO’s worries at 75

It was formed to unite the world’s strongest countries and preserve peace, but as NATO holds a celebration summit for its 75th anniversary, it faces tricky challenges (https://www.economist.com/leaders/2024/07/04/how-to-trump-proof-americas-alliances). Climate change is jeopardising Scottish salmon (https://www.economist.com/britain/2024/06/17/climate-change-casts-a-shadow-over-britains-biggest-food-export), one of Britain’s biggest food exports...

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Lurch in the left: France’s election shock

A tactical ploy to diminish the chances for Marine Le Pen’s hard-right National Rally has worked—a surprise result that puts the left in front, but no party in charge (https://www.economist.com/europe/2024/07/07/a-shock-election-result-in-france-puts-the-left-in-the-lead?utm_campaign=a.io&utm_medium=audio.podcast.np&utm_source=theintelligence&utm_content=discovery.content.anonymous.tr_shownotes_na-na_article&utm_term=sa.listeners)....

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BOOM! – Episode 1: 1968 Born to be wild

Why are two old, unpopular men the main candidates for the world’s most demanding job? It’s the question John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, gets asked the most. And the answer lies in the peculiar politics of the baby boomers. The generation born in the 1940s grew up in a land of endless growth and possibility, ruled by a confident, moderate elite. But just as they were embarking on adult life, all that started to come apart. The economy...

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Starming victory: Labour sweeps to power

Britain has elected a Labour government (https://www.economist.com/britain/2024/07/05/labours-landslide-victory-will-turn-politics-on-its-head) for the first time in 14 years. The party inherits a spattered legacy and a country that is often seen as a laughing stock internationally. We consider Sir Keir Starmer’s long to-do list: growing the economy, mending Britain’s reputation…and moving house within 24 hours...

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Meet Keir Starmer, Britain’s next prime minister

He will become Britain’s prime minister—but voters remain unsure what he stands for. So who is the real Sir Keir Starmer? 00:00 - Who is Keir Starmer? 00:39 - His life before politics 01:38 - His political rise 02:38 - His politics #breakingnews #breaking Sign up to The Economist’s daily newsletter: https://econ.st/3QAawvI See our UK general election coverage: https://econ.st/3RW6Hnt What’s happening in Britain?: https://econ.st/4cLnm5l Keir...

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1. 1968 – Born to be wild

The generation born in the 1940s grew up in a land of endless growth and possibility, ruled by a confident, moderate elite. But just as they were embarking on adult life, all that started to come apart. The economy faltered, and the post-war consensus came under pressure from two sides: from the radical right, who hated government moves on civil rights – and from the ‘New Left’, as boomers rebelled against their parents' generation and its war in...

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Leader of the package: Amazon turns 30

It has changed our lives and become one of the world’s most valuable companies. As Amazon turns 30 (https://www.economist.com/business/2024/07/01/what-next-for-amazon-as-it-turns-30?utm_campaign=a.io&utm_medium=audio.podcast.np&utm_source=theintelligence&utm_content=discovery.content.anonymous.tr_shownotes_na-na_article&utm_term=sa.listeners), what comes next? Education is key to social mobility in India...

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Degree programme: stopping heat deaths

As heatwaves become more frequent (https://www.economist.com/leaders/2024/06/26/simple-steps-to-stop-people-dying-from-heatwaves) and intense, they exacerbate existing inequalities. The poor, sick and elderly are particularly vulnerable. How should governments respond? Universities depend on the high fees international students pay. Now Indian scholars are replacing...

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Rule and divide: Donald Trump is judged immune

The US Supreme Court has granted (https://www.economist.com/united-states/2024/07/01/donald-trump-wins-a-big-victory-at-the-supreme-court) the former President immunity from prosecution for official acts committed while in office. We ask what that means for future Presidents and the 2024 American election. Humanity is standing by while sea levels rise. Now scientists want to geo-engineer polar ice...

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Trailer: Boom! How a generation blew up American politics

Why are two old, unpopular men the main candidates for the world’s most demanding job? It’s the question John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, gets asked the most. And the answer lies in the peculiar politics of the baby boomers. Since 1992, every American president bar one has been a white man born in the 1940s. That run looks likely to span 36 years - not far off the age of the median American. This cohort was born with aces in their...

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Bet noir: Macron’s electoral gamble backfires

Marine Le Pen’s far-right party made great gains in the first round of France’s parliamentary election (https://www.economist.com/europe/2024/06/30/a-crushing-blow-for-emmanuel-macrons-centrist-alliance). The left did too. We ask what this means for France and President Emmanuel Macron. Thailand will soon legalise same-sex marriage (https://www.economist.com/asia/2024/06/20/thailand-legalises-same-sex-marriage), but in other areas, democratic...

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The Weekend Intelligence: The state of Britain

On July 4th Britain will have a general election, one in which is widely expected to result in dramatic losses for the ruling Conservative party. If so, it would bring to an end 14 years of Tory rule. It’s been a turbulent period; the twin catastrophes of Brexit and Covid, set to the grinding and gloomy mood music of the 2008 financial crash. The Economist’s Andy Miller travels up and down the country, to the towns and cities shaped by these...

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