Category Archive: 5) Global Macro

Covid-19: how tech will transform your kids’ education | The Economist

The pandemic not only disrupted education—it also thrust technology onto a sector which historically has been slow to adopt it. Will classrooms ever be the same again? 00:00 How the pandemic has affected education. 03:08 Why the education sector has been slow to adopt technology. 05:02 Technology helps children have a personalised learning experience. 07:50 How technology can help teachers 09:08 Could remote learning be here to stay? Read more...

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Covid-19: Can vaccines keep up with variants? | The Economist

The race between covid-19 vaccines and variants is on. Alok Jha, The Economist’s science correspondent, and Natasha Loder, health policy editor, discuss what this means for the future Read more of our coverage on coronavirus: https://econ.st/3t1L6wx Listen to our daily podcast, Gamechangers, on mRNA technology: https://econ.st/38cSewe Listen to “The Jab” podcast from Economist Radio: https://econ.st/3yuETKF Watch our film about mandatory...

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Hydrogen: fuel of the future? | The Economist

It’s been hailed as fuel of the future. Hydrogen is clean, flexible and energy efficient. But in practice there are huge hurdles to overcome before widespread adoption can be achieved. 00:00 How hydrogen fuel is generated. 02:04 How hydrogen fuel could be used. 02:46 Why hydrogen fuel hasn't taken off in the past. 03:40 Is hydrogen fuel safe? 04:31 Hydrogen's advantage over batteries. 05:00 How sustainable is hydrogen fuel? 06:13 Why the hype...

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The Upside of a Stock Market Crash

A drought-stricken forest choked with dry brush and deadfall is an apt analogy. While a stock market crash that stairsteps lower for months or years is generally about as welcome as a trip to the guillotine in Revolutionary France, there is some major upside to a crash.

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The Smart Money Has Already Sold

Generations of punters have learned the hard way that their unwary greed is the tool the 'Smart Money' uses to separate them from their cash and capital.

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Afghanistan: how the Taliban weakened America | The Economist

The Taliban’s swift return to power in Afghanistan has shocked the world and humiliated America. What effect will this have on the international standing of the US and on global security? Our experts answer your questions. Further content: Find more of our coverage on Asia: https://econ.st/3srkBjq Read more about the Taliban’s terrifying triumph in Afghanistan:https://econ.st/3stoa91 Joe Biden is shirking responsibility for Afghanistan:...

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Taper *Without* Tantrum

Whomever actually coined the term “taper”, using it in the context of Federal Reserve QE for the first time, it wasn’t actually Ben Bernanke. On May 22, 2013, the central bank’s Chairman sat in front of Congressman Kevin Brady and used the phrase “step down in our pace of purchases.” No good, at least from the perspective of a media-driven need for a snappy one-word summary.

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Why the Global Economy Is Unraveling

Global supply chain logjams and global credit/financial crises aren't bugs, they're intrinsic features of Neoliberalism's fully financialized global economy. To understand why the global economy is unraveling, we have to look past the headlines to the primary dynamic of globalization: Neoliberalism, the ideological orthodoxy which holds that introducing market dynamics to sectors that were closed to global markets generates prosperity for all.

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Weekly Market Pulse: Happy Anniversary!

Today is the 50th anniversary of the “Nixon shock”, the day President Richard Nixon closed the gold window and ended the post-WWII Bretton Woods currency agreement. That agreement, largely a product of John Maynard Keynes, pegged the dollar to gold and most other currencies to the dollar.

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Should covid-19 vaccines be mandatory?

Most governments recognise that vaccination is the fastest way out of the pandemic, but in many places hesitancy is hindering the roll-out. Should employers—or even governments—force people to have the vaccine? We answer your questions. Read more of our covid-19 coverage: https://econ.st/37AvUfF Listen to “The Jab” podcast from Economist Radio: https://econ.st/3CJKBv8 Listen to our podcast about vaccine incentives: https://econ.st/2XmrDL9 How...

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CPI’s At Fives Yet Treasury Auctions

A momentous day, for sure, but one lost in what would turn out to be a seemingly endless sea of them. October 8, 2008, right in the thick of the world’s first global financial crisis (how could it have been global, surely not subprime mortgages?) the Federal Reserve took center stage; or tried to.

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Dear Fed: Are You Insane?

So sorry, America, but your central bank is certifiably insane, and it's not going to magically work out. History definitively shows that speculative bubbles always pop--always. Every speculative bubble mania, regardless of its supposed uniqueness--"it's different this time"--pops.

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A Real Example Of Price Imbalance

It’s not just the trade data from individual countries. Take the WTO’s estimates which are derived from exports and imports going into or out of nearly all of them. These figures show that for all that recovery glory being printed up out of Uncle Sam’s checkbook, the American West Coast might be the only place where we can find anything resembling Warren Buffett’s red-hot claim.

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The Two Big Anniversaries of August: The Lost Decade (plus) Of The ‘Fiat’ Half Century

As my esteemed podcast co-host Emil Kalinowski has already mentioned (recurrently), we have, this year, two major anniversaries during these dog days of summer circled on our calendar. Today is, obviously, August 9 and for anyone the slightest familiar with the eurodollar story, that date is seared into their consciousness for as long as it will take to rebuild from the ashes created by the monetary fire lit that day. It has been, sadly, fourteen...

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The End of Global Tourism?

Viewed as a complex non-linear system, the pandemic varinants can only be controlled by drastically pruning the physical connections between disparate global groups, which means effectively ending the unrestricted flow of individuals around the planet.

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Weekly Market Pulse: What Is Today’s New Normal?

Remember “The New Normal”? Back in 2009, Bill Gross, the old bond king before Gundlach came along, penned a market commentary called “On the Course to a New Normal” which he said would be: “a period of time in which economies grow very slowly as opposed to growing like weeds, the way children do; in which profits are relatively static; in which the government plays a significant role in terms of deficits and reregulation and control of the...

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Should we be worried about technology? | The Economist

The covid-19 pandemic has reinforced humanity’s dependence on modern tech, but the same tools that enable remote working are also being used to spread disinformation and perpetuate cybercrime. Ambivalence towards technology is nothing new. Read more of our coverage of Science & technology: https://econ.st/3CdkVa5 See our Technology Quarterlies: https://econ.st/3jldAN6 Why is pessimism about the impact of technology nothing new?...

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While the Herd Slumbers, Risk Is Rocketing Higher

This wholesale transfer of risk from elites to the workers is finally becoming consequential as wealth / income / security inequality is reaching extremes that are destabilizing society and the economy.

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Sophistry Dressed (as) Reallocation

Stop me if you’ve heard this before: About US$275 billion (about SDR 193 billion) of the new allocation will go to emerging markets and developing countries, including low-income countries.

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What is net zero? | The Economist

More than 50 countries around the world have pledged to become net zero. But what does net zero actually mean—and is it achievable? Find The Economist’s most recent coverage on climate change: https://econ.st/3zCt2uW Sign up to The Economist’s daily newsletter to keep up to date with our latest stories: https://econ.st/3gJBH8D Why do climate pledges fall short?: https://econ.st/3eVCYaI What are nationally determined contributions to curb...

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