Category Archive: 6b) Austrian Economics

The Secret Ronald Reagan Told Me about Gold and Great Nations

Today [August 15] marks 50 years since President Richard Nixon closed the “gold window,” ending the ability of foreign governments to exchange United States dollars for gold. Nixon’s action severed the last link between the dollar and gold, giving the U.S. a fiat currency.

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Feeling Sorry for College Students

An op-ed in the Los Angeles Times makes me feel sorry for many college students, at least many of those who take economics courses in their respective schools. In fact, the op-ed even causes me to feel sorry for the people at mainstream newspapers who decide which op-eds to publish in their papers.

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Bretton Woods and the Spoliation of Europe

Having marked the quinquagenary of the destruction of the gold standard Sunday, August 15, it is natural to be a little nostalgic for the Bretton Woods system. After all, it might not have been the classical gold standard, but at least it wasn’t as bad as the fiat standard that succeeded it.

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WaPo Editors: “Liberty” Requires Us to Implement Vaccine Passports

Mandating private and government employees to be immunized against covid-19 and requiring the use of standardized electronic passes as proof of immunization across the nation is what liberty is made of, the editors of the Washington Post argued last week. 

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Two Percent Inflation Is a Lot Worse Than You Think

With June 2021 CPI growth being at a thirteen-year high, inflation has been on a lot of people’s minds lately. You can’t blame them, seeing as over 23 percent of all dollars in existence were created in 2020 alone. Although future inflation is certainly an important concern, in this article I instead focus on the chronic inflation this country has faced for over a century.

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The Demise of the Gold Standard

This is the fiftieth anniversary of the demise of the gold standard and the beginning of the current fiat paper standard. Many will say “good riddance” to gold and “thank goodness” for the “good ole greenback”! Reflection, however, produces an alternative conclusion.

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A Look Back at Nixon’s Infamous Monetary Policy Decision

Putting the World on a Paper Standard Half a century ago one of the most disastrous monetary policy decisions in US history was committed by Richard Nixon.  In a television address, the president declared that the nation would no longer redeem internationally dollars for gold.  Since the dollar was the world’s reserve currency, Nixon’s closing of the “Gold Window” put the world on an irredeemable paper monetary standard.

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Why the NARA Secrecy Over the Secret JFK Records?

For some unknown reason, there seems to be some secrecy on the part of the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) over the still-secret 58-year-old records of the CIA and other federal agencies relating to the Kennedy assassination.

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Inflation’s Assault on the Family

I moved aside and watched our twelve-year-old van pull into the driveway. My wife opened the door, smiled, and told me she got the job. Putting the basketball down, I hugged her and told her I was proud. The job was a part-time evening and weekend position at the local country health food store, a good fit considering my wife's interests. But deep down, a sense of sadness and partial defeat rolled over me.

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The Case Against the New “Secular Stagnation Hypothesis”

Abstract: The new “secular stagnation hypothesis” developed by Lawrence H. Summers attempts to justify why the demand stimulus applied in the aftermath of the global financial crisis failed to revive growth in a satisfactory manner.

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An Anatomy of Failure: China’s Wind Power Development

Abstract: China is currently the world’s largest installer of wind power. However, with twice the installed wind capacity compared to the United States in 2015, the Chinese produce less power. The question is: Why is this the case? This article shows that Chinese grid connectivity is low, Chinese firms have few international patents, and that export is low even though production capacity far exceeds domestic production needs.

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Why the State Demands Control of Money

Imagine you are in command of the state, defined as an institution that possesses a territorial monopoly of ultimate decision making in every case of conflict, including conflicts involving the state and its agents itself, and, by implication, the right to tax, i.e., to unilaterally determine the price that your subjects must pay you to perform the task of ultimate decision making.

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The Old Right on War and Peace

As the force of the New Deal reached its heights, both foreign and domestic, during World War II, a beleaguered and tiny libertarian opposition began to emerge and to formulate its total critique of prevailing trends in America.

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Savings Are the Foundation of Economic Growth

Most commentators’ regard savings as harmful to economic growth on the ground that savings are associated with fewer outlays. These commentators portray economic activity as a circular flow of money. Spending by one individual becomes part of the earnings of another individual, and spending by another individual becomes part of the first individual’s earnings.

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What Made Rothbard Great

If you don’t mind, I am going to do what men of my age do from time to time, and that is tell you war stories—usually insufferably boring for younger people, but occasionally enlightening if you find that perhaps you are going through a similar trial. I want to talk about my own situation in 1961, ’62, ’63, when I was an undergraduate.

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“They Said What?!” John Lennon edition

Bob unveils a new recurring series, in which he gives the context of infamous quotations. In this episode, he covers two allegedly shocking quotes from John Lennon, John Maynard Keynes' "in the long run we're all dead," Trump on Nazis being very fine people, Dan Quayle misspelling potato, Obama's "you didn't build that," and Bohm-Bawerk on Karl Marx.

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End the Shutdown, Again

Sixteen months ago, in March 2020, we argued for an end to government-imposed shutdowns of businesses, schools, churches, restaurants, and events due to the covid virus: The shutdown of the American economy by government decree should end. The lasting and far-reaching harms caused by this authoritarian precedent far outweigh those caused by the COVID-19 virus.

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How the Federalists Bullied Rhode Island into Joining the United States

Doughty, courageous little Rhode Island was the last state left. It is generally assumed that—even by the most staunchly Antifederalist historians—Rhode Island could not conceivably have gone it alone as a separate nation.

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Modern Monetary Theory

Recorded at the Mises Institute in Auburn, Alabama, on 21 July 2021.

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Eine „gute“ Inflation gibt es nicht, aber es gibt „gute“ Preissteigerungen

Eine „gute“ Inflation gibt es nicht, aber es gibt „gute“ Preissteigerungen 19.07.2021 – Tot ist die Inflation nie, allenfalls nur scheintot – Wann Preissteigerungen Inflation sind – Inflation durch übermäßiges Ausweiten der Geldmenge – Nicht alle Preisanstiege sind Inflation – Alle Preise vermitteln Informationen, zumal wenn sie steigen – Eine „gute“ Inflation gibt es nicht, aber es gibt „gute“ Preissteigerungen – Die gute Inflation ist Humbug von...

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