Category Archive: 6b) Austrian Economics

With Inflation at a 40-Year High, the Fed Is Too Afraid to Act

Price inflation has been accelerating upward since April of last year. Yet the Fed has done virtually nothing. What's the Fed waiting for?

Read More »

Mapping the Conflict in the Ukraine

Russian Troops in the Crimea John Kerry is appropriately aghast at the “incredible act of aggression” by Russia in the Ukraine: “You just don’t in the 21st century behave in 19th century fashion by invading another country on completely trumped up pre-text,” Kerry told the CBS program “Face the Nation.”

Read More »

Sanctions Kill Innocent People and Also Destroy Our Liberty

While American statists are cheering the U.S. government’s sanctions on Russia, 71-year-old John Hanick shows us how the cheers are also for the destruction of the rights and liberties of the American people. That’s because U.S. officials have just charged Hanick, who is an American citizen who once worked at Fox News as a director, with a federal criminal offense for violating U.S. sanctions on Russia. Hanick now faces up to 20 years in a federal...

Read More »

Inflation: Who or What Is the Culprit?

Inflation—defined herein as a widespread increase in the prices of widely purchased consumer goods—has gotten worse since I commented on it last spring. According to the official Consumer Price Index (CPI), inflation is currently running at 7.5 percent year over year—the highest since 1982.

Read More »

Behind Klaus Schwab, the World Economic Forum, and the Great Reset: Part 3

Bob continues his series on Klaus Schwab and the Great Reset, highlighting an interesting remark in Biden's SOTU, Strobe Talbott's open support for global government, and the introduction to Schwab's book on Covid-19 and the Great Reset.

Read More »

Why Sanctions Don’t Work, and Why They Mostly Hurt Ordinary People

The United States and its western European allies have in recent days repeatedly increased economic sanctions against not only the Russian regime, but against millions of ordinary Russians. 

Read More »

Why Putin Probably Hasn’t Doomed the Dollar

In this episode of Radio Rothbard, Ryan McMaken and Tho Bishop look at the economic consequences of Russia's invasion of Ukraine. What has been the damage from America's weaponization of the dollar? Is Russia likely to return to the gold standard? What may be the fallout in Europe?

Read More »

Pushing toward Nuclear War

According to Yahoo! News, “More than two dozen foreign policy experts have called for the United States and NATO to institute a partial no-fly zone over Ukraine, which would serve as an escalation of the conflict with Russia.” Joining them is Illinois Republican Congressman Adam Kinzinger, who also happens to be a former Air Force combat officer. That would mean the U.S. military would be shooting down Russian planes containing Russian soldiers. ...

Read More »

JERM WARFARE WITH ASTRID STUCKELBERGER & CLAUDIO GRASS & BREAKING FREE FROM COVID MADNESS

Astrid Stuckelberger and Claudio Grass have been on my podcast before.

Read More »

Winner and Losers in the Ukraine Crisis

Let’s examine winners and losers in the Ukraine crisis. Let’s start with the losers. The biggest loser are the people of Ukraine. They are being killed, injured, and maimed by the Russian invasion of their country. The invasion is also destroying their homes, businesses, and, well, their entire country. 

Read More »

Economic Aspects of the Pension Problem

On Whom Does the Incidence Fall? Whenever a law or labor union pressure burdens the employers with an additional expenditure for the benefit of the employees, people talk of “social gains.”

Read More »

What Would Mises Have Thought of “Special Economic Zones”?

SEZs are loopholes, and capitalism breathes through loopholes. But like all loopholes, they tend to benefit those who can afford to hire the lawyers who can identify said loopholes. Original Article: "What Would Mises Have Thought of "Special Economic Zones"?" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

Read More »

China Needs to Pop Its Property Bubble

The financial woes of the giant real estate developer Evergrande, which carries an estimated debt of $300 billion, have rekindled global fears that China’s property bubble is about to burst. Such predictions have occurred repeatedly in the past, in particular since 2010, and have been fueled by the rapid rise of property prices, construction volumes, and real estate debt. Today, many analysts fear that if the property bubble collapses, the impact...

Read More »

Ukraine’s Regime Is Now Kidnapping Fathers for Military “Service”

As the Ukraine regime has imposed martial law in the wake of the Russia invasion, it has also apparently imposed a new near-universal conscription order. USA Today reports: The Ukraine State Border Guard Service has announced that men ages 18 to 60 are prohibited from leaving the country, according to reports.

Read More »

Canada’s Freezing of Protesters’ Finances Shows How the “War on Cash” Ends.

The Canadian government is now freezing the bank accounts and personal assets of those who donated to support the Freedom Convoy, which is an organized political protest of the vaccine mandates. The deputy prime minister announced that they will retain these so-called emergency powers permanently going forward and will also seek to implement additional measures to further restrict the ability of political protestors to raise funds or otherwise use...

Read More »

Death by Inflation or by Interest Rate Hikes?

Inflation is skyrocketing in practically the entire world. Central banks are getting scared and beginning to announce the end of expansionary measures, also known as tapering. Why do central banks find themselves in a dilemma? Why has inflation risen so much? What is a bottleneck? What does tapering mean, and how could it affect us? The objective of this article is to answer these, and other, questions.

Read More »

Economic Knowledge Is Qualitative, Not Quantitative

According to the popular way of thinking, our knowledge of the economy is elusive. Consequently, the best that we can do is to attempt to ascertain some facts of economic reality by applying various statistical methods to the so-called macro data.

Read More »

Russian Weakness and the Russian “Threat” to the West

The current advocates for US aggression against Russia would have us believe that Russia is some sort of peer of the United States and of Western Europe. Tom Rogan at the hawkish Washington Examiner, for example, insists that Russia is a "great power," presumably comparable to the United States in spite of Russia's small economy. Moreover, as Ted Galen Carpenter notes, hawks are fond are speaking of modern Russia as if it were pretty...

Read More »

Is NATO a Dead Man Walking?

While geopolitical commentators are fixated on Russia’s border with Ukraine, a more interesting development is slowly boiling underneath the surface of the Russo-Ukrainian conflict that could potentially reorder international relations—namely, the death of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO).

Read More »

Money and Savings Are Not the Same Thing

In the National Income and Product Accounts (NIPA), savings are established as the difference between disposable money income and monetary outlays. Disposable income is defined as the summation of all personal money income less tax payments to the government. Personal income includes wages and salaries, transfer payments, income from interest and dividends, and rental income. The NIPA framework is based on the Keynesian view that spending by one...

Read More »