Category Archive: 6b) Austrian Economics

Wie drei Frauen versuchten, die Amerikaner vom Sozialismus abzubringen

Im Jahr 1943, als die kollektivistische Politik auf dem Vormarsch war, geschah etwas Außergewöhnliches. Drei Frauen veröffentlichten in diesem Jahr drei Bücher, die die Amerikaner von ihrem sozialistischen Taumeln befreien und sie an die grundlegenden amerikanischen Werte der individuellen Freiheit, der begrenzten Regierungsgewalt, der freien Marktwirtschaft und des Unternehmertums erinnern sollten.

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Reality check: The “miracle recovery” narrative

Over the last few weeks, we’ve been constantly bombarded by news reports and “expert” analyses celebrating an incredible global economic recovery. They’re not even presented as projections or expectations anymore, but as a fact, as though the return to vibrant growth is already underway.

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Is Tucker Carlson Right About Replacement Theory?

Tucker Carlson seems to believe that if it weren't for immigrants, America would be dominated by religiously devout, tradition-minded, liberty-loving Americans in every corner of the nation. Perhaps he's not familiar with the effects of American universities and public schools? Be sure to follow Radio Rothbard at Mises.org/RadioRothbard.

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America’s “Great Men” and the Constitutional Convention

From the very beginning of the great emerging struggle over the Constitution the Antifederalist forces suffered from a grave and debilitating problem of leadership. The problem was that the liberal leadership was so conservatized that most of them agreed that centralizing revisions of the Articles were necessary—as can be seen from the impost and congressional regulation of commerce debates during the 1780s.

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Nicht jeder Preisanstieg ist Inflation

Immer wieder wird Inflation genannt, was keine ist – Markt- und inflationsbedingter Preisanstieg sind auseinander zu halten – Märkte, auf denen die Preise inflationsbedingt schon gestiegen sind.

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State Legislatures Are Finally Limiting Governors’ Emergency Powers. But only Some of Them.

Last week, Indiana Governor Eric Holcomb vetoed a bill that would limit gubernatorial authority in declaring emergencies. The bill would allow the General Assembly to call itself into an emergency session, with the idea that the legislature could then vote to end, or otherwise limit, a governor’s emergency powers.

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What Exactly Is Neoliberalism, and Is It a Bad Thing?

There are few things nowadays that ignite more hatred, especially within university campuses, than declaring oneself to be a neoliberal (if the reader is not convinced, he is invited to try it himself and see what happens).

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Weltweite Mindeststeuern: Eine brandgefährliche Idee

Grundsätzlich herrscht, abseits von Kreisen eingefleischter Marxisten, weitgehend Einigkeit darüber, dass der Wettbewerb zwischen den Anbietern von Waren und Dienstleistungen Kreativität freisetzt, Innovationen fördert, die Produktivität steigert und die Preise für die Konsumenten senkt. Ohne Wettbewerb bedeutet der Trabant den Gipfel der Automobilentwicklung; unter Wettbewerbsbedingungen entsteht der S-Klasse-Mercedes. Beides probiert – kein...

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Biden’s New Budget Plan Means Trump-Era Mega Spending Will Continue

The reality of federal spending under Donald Trump did much to put to rest the obviously wrong and long-disproved notion that Republicans are the political party of “fiscal responsibility.” With George W. Bush and Ronald Reagan, it was pretty much “full speed ahead” as far as federal spending was concerned. Under George W. Bush, some of the biggest budget-busting years were those during which the Republicans also controlled Congress.

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How Federal Funding Is Used to Control Colleges and Universities

The Washington Post reports that a group of thirty-three current and former students at Christian colleges are suing the Department of Education in a class action lawsuit in an attempt to abolish any religious exemptions for schools that do not abide by the current sexual and gender zeitgeist sweeping the land.

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The Property-Based Social Order Is Being Destroyed by Central Banks

Private property is an institution central to civilization and beneficial human interaction. When central banks distort this institution with easy money, the social effects can be disastrous. 

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Progressivism’s Failures: From Minimum Wages to the Welfare State

The empirical evidence shows that neither minimum wages or welfare reduce poverty. In fact, minimum wages tend to increase the cost of living while poverty rates have gone nowhere since the Great Society was introduced.

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Anti-Vaccine and Anti-Vaping: Against Science and Innovation

Among the many problems originated by the Covid 19 pandemic, one of the most important is the resurgence of the anti-vaccine movement. Conspiracy theories, ridiculous arguments and unfounded accusations have given renewed fuel to one of the most anti-scientific and destructive trends we have ever seen.

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Precious metals are and always have been the ultimate insurance

As we enter the second quarter of 2021, the year during which so many mainstream analysts and politicians have predicted we’ll see a miraculous recovery from the covid crisis, it is becoming increasingly clear that the damage inflicted by the lockdowns and the shutdowns is really very extensive an persistent. Of course, I’m referring to the damage to the real economy, that is, to actual businesses, households and the countless citizens that were...

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The Annapolis Convention: The Beginning of the Counterrevolution

By 1787, the nationalist forces were in a far stronger position than during the Revolutionary War to make their dreams of central power come true. Now, in addition to the reactionary ideologues and financial oligarchs, public creditors, and disgruntled ex-army officers, other groups, some recruited by the depression of the mid-1780s, were ready to be mobilized into an ultra-conservative constituency.

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The Tyranny of the “Enlightened” Experts

If you were to stroll through any typical upper-middle-income American neighborhood in 2021, the odds are very high that you’d observe at least one yard sign exuberantly proclaiming something like this: “In this house, we believe that science is real, love is love, no human is illegal … ” and other banal tautologies.

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Planned Chaos in Immigration

REMINDER: Our zoom conference “The National Security State and the JFK Assassination” continues this Wednesday at 7 pm Eastern. To attend the conference, just register at our conference page. A zoom link will be sent to you. We are now moving into the medical-evidence portion of the conference.

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Progressivism’s Failures: From Minimum Wages to the Welfare State

As I write, the Democratic Congress is contemplating various measures designed to alleviate poverty levels in the United States. They include: the doubling of the minimum wage; the expansion of child credits. Let’s review both.

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Pandemic diplomacy in the Western Balkans

The business of fighting Covid-19 is now estimated at around $150 billion. As of March 2021, 354 million vaccine doses have been delivered – 90 percent of them to countries that are home to only 10 percent of the world’s population. If 65 to 85 percent of people have to be vaccinated to reach global immunity, then it is unlikely to happen this year.

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The Economic Effects of Pandemics: An Austrian Analysis

Traditionally, Austrian theorists have focused with particular interest on the recurrent cycles of boom and recession that affect our economies and on studying the relationship between these cycles and certain characteristic modifications to the structure of capital-goods stages.

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