Category Archive: 6b) Austrian Economics

Will the Pentagon Induce Russia to Use Tactical Nukes in Ukraine?

For the past 25 years, the Pentagon has moved inexorably toward admitting Ukraine into NATO, which would then permit the Pentagon to install its nuclear missiles in Ukraine — that is, on Russia’s border.

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Contrary to What Some Economists Claim, the Fed Can’t Give the Economy a “Neutral” Rate of Interest

On April 19, 2022, at the Economic Club in New York, the Chicago Federal Reserve Bank president Charles Evans said the Fed is likely to lift by year end its federal funds rate target range close to the neutral range of between 2.25 to 2.50 percent. Furthermore, on April 21, 2022, Fed chairman Jerome Powell corroborated this by stating that the Fed wants to raise its benchmark rate to the neutral level.

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Forget What the “Experts” Claim about Deflation: It Strengthens the Economy

For most experts, deflation is bad news since it generates expectations for a continued decline in prices, leading consumers to postpone the purchases of present goods, since they expect to purchase them at lower prices in the future. Consequently, this weakens the overall flow of current spending and this, in turn, weakens the economy.

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War in Ukraine – Week 10

This is Liza. She is 15 years old. After her town got shelled and two people got injured she volunteered to drive them to get some medical help, because no one else would. First she got through mines on the road, then Russian soldiers shot at the car, injuring both of her legs. But she kept driving until the car stopped. Fortunately, they got picked up by our guys, and this brave little girl and her passengers are recovering right now.

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Is It “Disloyal” to “Side with Russia”?

Last week, I received an email from a conservative-oriented libertarian who suggested to me that it is disloyal to “side with Russia” because Ukraine was “just sitting there” when it was invaded by Russia.

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Roots of Our Current Inflation: A Deeply Flawed Monetary System

A monetary system that allows the creation of money out of thin air is vulnerable to the fits of credit expansion and credit contraction. Periods of credit expansion typically occur over many years and even decades while the phases of credit contraction happen like sudden implosions. The monetary policy makers tend to promote the prolongation of credit expansion because they fear deflation.

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Expect Washington to Throw a Fit over China’s New Deal with the Solomon Islands

Washington regards the entire world as its "sphere of influence." But now Beijing is looking to follow the US playbook on hegemony and expand Beijing's network of military bases abroad.

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The EU energy price crisis – is the market design to blame?

The electricity prices reflect the supply and demand conditions in Europe and interfering with the price formation mechanism would have dangerous consequences.

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What Determines Interest Rates? Comparing Mainstream Economics to the Austrian School

The conventional view among mainstream economists, as presented by Milton Friedman, is that three factors determine market interest rates: liquidity, economic activity, and inflationary expectations. In this viewpoint, whenever the central bank raises the growth rate in the money supply by buying financial assets such as Treasurys, this pushes the prices of Treasurys higher and their yields lower.

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The Fed’s New “Tightening” Plan Is Too Little, Too Late

Since 2008, a key component of Fed policy has been to buy up mortgage-based securities and government debt so as to both prop up asset prices and increase the money supply. Over this time, the Fed has bought nearly $9 trillion in assets, thus augmenting demand and increasing prices for both government bonds and housing assets.

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No, It’s Not the Putin Price Hike, No Matter What Joe Biden Claims

Politicians love their buzzwords and talking points, and the Joe Biden White House and the Democratic Party use them as much or more than when Donald Trump and the Republicans ran Washington’s freak show. Last year, the mantra from the Biden administration was that inflation was “transitory,” meaning that the inflation would not last long.

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It’s Mid-2022 and the Fed Has Still Done Nothing to Fight Inflation

It was last August when Jerome Powell began to admit that inflation just might be a problem. But even then, he was only willing to say that inflation would likely be “moderately” above the arbitrary 2 percent inflation standard. Back in August, low inflation—not high inflation—was still perceived to be the “problem."

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Gold: A use case for the modern era

Part II of II The big picture here is clear and it is essential to understand that it represents a very significant paradigm shift. Whether it is online or offline, whether it is through a mobile app, an exchange or even through physical contracts, ownership titles to gold holdings keep changing hands. And thus, no matter the vehicle that is used to facilitate these transactions, the fact of the matter is that it acts as a gold-backed...

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The Economic Sanctions against Russia Are Destructive and Counterproductive: We Must Oppose Them

Imposing economic sanctions upon Russia is tantamount to throwing gasoline on a raging fire. The sanctions will not end the Russian invasion of Ukraine and only will make things worse. Original Article: "The Economic Sanctions against Russia Are Destructive and Counterproductive: We Must Oppose Them" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon.

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To Fight Russia, Europe’s Regimes Risk Impoverishment and Recession for Europe

Politicians have become accustomed to conjuring whatever they want through the “miracle” of printing money. But in the real world, it’s still necessary to produce oil and gas through actual physical production. Original Article: "To Fight Russia, Europe's Regimes Risk Impoverishment and Recession for Europe" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon.

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Gold: A use case for the modern era

Part I of II For decades, physical gold investors have had to contend with superficial, naive and wholly ahistorical “arguments” from the mainstream financial press, from economists and experts of all stripes, claiming that gold is nothing but a barbarous relic. To them, the yellow metal is akin to investment superstition. It has no yield, it serves no practical purpose and the only attraction they could conceive of is merely symbolic, or...

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Wie das unsolide Finanzsystem extreme Kreditzyklen auslöst, die zum Kollaps führen

Ein staatliches Fiat-Währungssystem mit einer nur teilweisen Deckung des Geldumlaufs durch die Bankreserven macht es möglich, dass die Geschäftsbanken mehr Geld als in Umlauf bringen als sie an Bargeld halten. Das sogenannte Giralgeld wird als Bankeinlagen gleichsam aus dem Nichts geschaffen.

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1991: When America Tried to Keep Ukraine in the USSR

The US government today likes to pretend that it is the perennial champion of political independence for countries that were once behind the Iron Curtain. What is often forgotten, however, is that in the days following the fall of the Berlin Wall, Washington opposed independence for Soviet republics like Ukraine and the Baltic states.

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The Economic Sanctions against Russia Are Destructive and Counterproductive: We Must Oppose Them

The Western sanctions against Russia seem to shock very few Westerns. Yet, for several reasons, these sanctions should at least be the subject of lively debate in Western societies. Firstly, these sanctions are illegal from the standpoint of international law (only the Security Council can approve economic sanctions, according to article 41 of the Charter of the United Nations).

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Elon Musk’s Twitter Gambit and What It Means to the “Clique in Power”

Elon Musk’s bid to take over Twitter and turn it into a private company has apparently been successful. Now the real action begins. Musk’s buyout exposes the Big Digital media complex to unwanted and unwonted competition, while threatening to loosen its near-total control of information and opinion.

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