Category Archive: 6b) Austrian Economics

The NATO Lie

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has brought to the forefront the NATO treaty to which the United States is a party. President Biden and the Pentagon have steadfastly maintained that a Russian attack on any NATO member automatically obligates the United States to go to war against Russia.

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How Did CNN+ Get Canned by Netflix? Austrian Economists Might Have an Answer

Days after Netflix reported bad earnings and an “unexpected” hit to their subscriber base, CNN announced that it had pulled the plug on its own brand-new streaming service, CNN+. Despite arguments to the contrary from the parent company, the CNN+ adventure turned out to be a costly mistake that attracted few subscribers and a paltry number of regular viewers.

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Warum man „Inflation“ nicht messen kann

Über „die Inflation” wird viel Irreführendes geredet. Von Politikern, Zeitkommentatoren und selbst von manchen Ökonomen. Schon die am meisten verbreitete Definition ist falsch. So heißt es, „Inflation” sei ein anhaltender Anstieg der Preise. Weiterhin wird behauptet, dieser Anstieg ließe sich messen und demnach ergebe sich das „Preisniveau” und die „Inflationsrate”.

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War in Ukraine – Week 8

4-year old Alisa is begging to be evacuated from under siege Mariupol. So are thousands of others after about 50 days underground. But russia won’t allow it. They are holding these people hostage, watching them die slowly and painfully one by one. Source: Nataliya Melnyk on Facebook

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Vietnam Should Have Been the End of US Foreign Intervention. It Wasn’t, and the World Is Worse Off

In 1975, after nearly a decade of outright conflict, the United States government abandoned its doomed escapade in Vietnam. It left a devastated country and over a million corpses in its wake. The corrupt South Vietnamese regime, already teetering on utter collapse, completely dissolved without American support.

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Mises in America

[William Peterson was the 2006 Schlarbaum laureate, and here is his acceptance speech, delivered October 8, 2005.] Gary Schlarbaum, I thank you for this award and high honor from your grand legacy in loving memory of a genius in our time, Ludwig von Mises (1881–1973). But let me say up front, fellow Miseseans, meet me, Mr. Serendipity, Bill Peterson, here by a fluke, a child of fickle fate. For frankly I had never heard of the famous Mises when I...

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To Fight Russia, Europe’s Regimes Risk Impoverishment and Recession for Europe

European politicians are eager to be seen as "doing something" to oppose the Russian regime following Moscow's invasion of Ukraine. Most European regimes have wisely concluded—Polish and Baltic recklessness notwithstanding—that provoking a military conflict with nuclear-armed Russia is not a good idea.

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Real Wages Fall Again as Inflation Surges and the Fed Plays the Blame Game

Money printing may bring rising wages, but it also brings rising prices for goods and services. And those increases are outpacing the wage increases. Original Article: "Real Wages Fall Again as Inflation Surges and the Fed Plays the Blame Game" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon.

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The Nationalities Question

[This article was published in in The Irrepressible Rothbard, available in the Mises Store.] Upon the collapse of centralizing totalitarian Communism in Eastern Europe and even the Soviet Union, long suppressed ethnic and nationality questions and conflicts have come rapidly to the fore. The crack-up of central control has revealed the hidden but still vibrant "deep structures" of ethnicity and nationality. To those of us who glory in...

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Is Switzerland still a safe jurisdiction for precious metals investors?

Over the last two years, we’ve all witnessed state abuses of power and extreme overreaches the likes of which many average citizens had never imagined they’d see in their own lifetimes. This caused a great part of the body politic in many Western nations to revisit their previously held beliefs about what is and isn’t possible for their governments to do and to question whether there really is such a thing as going “too far” or whether anyone in...

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Jon Stewart Asks Great Questions of Federal Reserve Chief

In a recent episode of “The Problem With Jon Stewart,” the former Daily Show host asks former president of the Kansas City Fed Thomas Hoenig why the Fed couldn’t have bailed out homeowners, or just “quantitative ease” away the Treasury’s debt. Hoenig gives muddy answers, so Bob tries to clarify.

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The Deferentials

Let’s have a thought experiment. Suppose that North Korean leader Kim Jong-un and Cuban president Miguel Mario Díaz-Canel Bermúdez issued a joint announcement stating that North Korea had accepted an invitation to install some of its nuclear missiles in Cuba. The announcement made it clear that although the missiles could reach any American city, they would be entirely for the defense of Cuba, not for the purpose of attacking the United...

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Keynesians and Market Monetarists Didn’t See Inflation Coming

The government’s latest report puts the twelve-month official consumer price inflation rate at 8.5 percent, the highest since December 1981: As economists debate the causes of, and cure for, this price inflation, it’s worth recounting which schools of thought saw it coming. Although individuals can be nuanced, generally speaking the Austrians have been warning that the Fed’s reckless policies threaten the dollar. In contrast, as I will document...

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How the Fed’s Tampering with the Policy Rate Affects the Yield Curve

At the end of March this year the difference between the yield on the ten-year Treasury bond and the yield on the two-year Treasury bond fell to 0.010 percent from 1.582 percent at the end of March 2021.

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Hoppe: “My Dream Is of a Europe Which Consists of 1,000 Liechtensteins.”

Interviewer: I would like to welcome our second guest in the studio. It is the philosopher and economist with an international range Hans-Hermann Hoppe. Nice to meet you, Mr. Hoppe. The dream of a united Europe, the eternal longing of the empire. Do you also dream this dream?

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Darshan Mehta: Insights Are Game Changers For Business

What drives customer behavior and customer choices? It’s the existential question for business; you’ve got to know the answer. But it’s a mystery, hard to unlock. The solution to this answer lies in what market researchers call insights, based on the Austrian deductive method that we summarized in episode #164 with Per Bylund (Mises.org/E4B_164).

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Staat und Krieg

Aus ökonomischer Sicht lässt sich argumentieren: Der Staat (wie wir ihn heute kennen) ist aggressiv. Kriegerische Auseinandersetzungen zwischen Staaten sind daher auch kein tragischer Zufallsfehler, sie sind vielmehr ein logisches Ergebnis.

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The Biggest Threat to Our Freedom and Well-Being

There are some important things to note about the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. Our rights do not come from the Constitution or the Bill of Rights. As the Declaration of Independence states, our rights come from nature and God, not from the federal government, not from the Constitution, and not from the Bill of Rights.

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Real Wages Fall Again as Inflation Surges and the Fed Plays the Blame Game

According to a new report released Wednesday by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Consumer Price Index increased in March by 8.6 percent, measured year over year (YOY). This is the largest increase in more than forty years. To find a higher rate of CPI inflation, we have to go back to December 1981, when the year-over-year increase was 9.6 percent.

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We Still Haven’t Reached the Inflation Finale

Inflations have an inbuilt mechanism which works to burn them out. Government (including the central bank) can thwart the mechanism if they resort to further monetary injections of sufficient power. Hence inflations can run for a long time and in virulent form. This occurs where the money issuers see net benefit from making new monetary injections even though likely to be less than for the initial one which took so many people by surprise.

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