Tag Archive: Libor

LIBOR Was Expected To Drop. It Dropped. What Might This Mean?

Everyone hates LIBOR, until it does something interesting. It used to be the most boring interest rate in the world. When it was that, it was also the most important. Though it followed along federal funds this was only because of the arb between onshore (NYC) and offshore (mainly London, sometimes Caymans) conducted by banks between themselves and their subs (whichever was located where).

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FX Daily, May 09: Oil Prices Surge and Dollar Gains Extended Post Withdrawal Announcement

The US dollar is broadly higher as the 10-year yield probes above 3.0%. Disappointing French industrial production and manufacturing data for March provided additional incentive, as if it were needed, to extend the euro's losses. The euro dipped below $1.1825. The single currency is off a cent this week after falling nearly two last week. A 38.2% retracement of the euro's gains since the beginning of last year is found a little above $1.1700 and...

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FX Daily, March 28: Three Developments Shaping Month-End

Today may be the last day of full liquidity until next Tuesday, after the Easter holidays. We identify three developments that are characterizing the end of the month, quarter, and for some countries and companies, the fiscal year. Equity market sell-off, bond market rally, and the continued rise in LIBOR.

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FX Weekly Preview: The Investment Climate

The investment meme of a synchronized global upturn has been undermined by the recent string of US and European economic data. The flash March eurozone composite reading fell to 55.3, the lowest reading since January 2017. Although Q4 17 US GDP may be revised higher (toward 2.8% from 2.5%) mostly due to greater inventory accumulation, the curse of weak Q1 GDP appears to be showing its hand again, with forecasts now coming in below 2%.

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Risk Off: Global Stocks Slide As “Fire And Fury” Results In “Selling And Fear”

US futures are set for a sharply lower open (at least in recent market terms) following a steep decline in European stocks and a selloff in Asian shares, following yesterday's sharp escalation in the war of words between the U.S. and North Korea. In a broad risk-off move U.S. Treasuries rose, the VIX surged above 12 overnight, while German bund futures climbed to the highest level in six weeks. The Swiss franc gained 1.2 percent to 1.1320 per euro...

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How The US Government Let A Giant Bank Pin A Scandal On A Former Employee

The following is an excerpt from David Enrich's nonfiction financial and legal thriller The Spider Network: The Wild Story of a Math Genius, a Gang of Backstabbing Bankers, and One of the Greatest Scams in Financial History. (Read part of the prologue here; another excerpt can be found here) This excerpt takes place shortly after the accused mastermind of the Libor scandal, Tom Hayes, is fired from his job at Citigroup, kicking government...

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Negative Consumer Financing Rates in Germany, Soon More Negative in Switzerland?

Things are increasingly upside down in the brave new centrally planned world: thanks to negative deposit rates central banks have put an explicit cost on saving, while in various instances, such as taking out a mortgage in Denmark and the Netherlands, the bank actually pays the borrower, thus rewarding living beyond one's means.

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SIBOR Forex Banking Fraud – another FX rate rigging scandal

Forex has been the big banks secret gold mine, supporting their other losing operations (like normal banking business, lending, etc.). To a large extent this has been unraveling, and this SIBOR lawsuit is another attack on their risk free profit center (FX). Read the entire lawsuit released by Elite E Services here in full.

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LIBOR Alternatives Taking Shape

Since the LIBOR scandal erupted, US officials have been working toward an alternative benchmark.  In 2014, the Fed set up a working committee that includes more than a dozen large banks and regulators   Before the weekend the committee (Alternative Reference Rates Committee) proposed two possible replacements for LIBOR. There reportedly was some consideration of …

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FINMA Fines UBS, All Markets are Manipulated?

Gold and Silver Are Manipulated Deutsche Bank admitted today that it participated with other big banks in manipulating gold and silver prices. In 2014, Switzerland’s financial regulator (FINMA) found “serious misconduct” and a “...

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(3) Inflation, Central Banks and Interest Rates

In this chapter we connect three related concepts: inflation, central banks and interest rates.

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(6) FX Theory: Carry Trade and Reverse Carry Trade

This page discusses two closely related concepts: the carry trade and the reverse carry trade.

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SNB Monetary Assessment March 2013

In its monetary assessment the SNB maintains the EUR/CHF floor and warned against further risks in the euro zone. The SNB has downgraded the inflation path to -0.2% (previously-0.1%) in 2013 and +0.2% (+0.4%) in 2014.We do not completely agree.

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The Swiss-tuation: Negative LIBOR

[unable to retrieve full-text content]We're through the looking glass, people! Not only is Abercrombie & Fitch paying people not to wear its clothing, but now some bank somewhere claims to be getting a negative rate to lend Swiss francs in the short term to another bank.

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EUR/CHF, a Year of Free Market (07/2010-07/2011): September 2010

Cable Showing Signs Of Tiredness Cable rallied above 1.5900 in the early European rush to sell EUR/GBP but the sharp fall since doesn’t bode well for the short term bulls. I personally have exited most of my long position and will look to reinstate towards 1.5500. GBP/CHF once again halted at the major 1.5360 low … Continue reading »

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Recent History of the Swiss franc: March 2009

A history of the EUR/CHF from the website ForexLive March 2009 Be Warned, April Fools Day Don’t believe everything you hear today as somebody might be having you on! The CHF is making a comeback and it’s imminent demise, which I have been forecasting, is obviously greatly exaggerated. EUR/CHF is back under 1.5100 and no sign … Continue reading »

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