Category Archive: 5.) The Economist

French anti-foreign legion: an EU-election shock

Hard-right parties did well in Europe's parliamentary elections—so well in France that President Emmanuel Macron called (https://www.economist.com/europe/2024/06/09/as-the-french-hard-right-triumphs-in-eu-elections-macron-calls-snap-vote?utm_campaign=a.io&utm_medium=audio.podcast.np&utm_source=theintelligence&utm_content=discovery.content.anonymous.tr_shownotes_na-na_article&utm_term=sa.listeners) a risky snap election. Elsewhere,...

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The Modi Raj 1: The chaiwallah’s son

Narendra Modi has been chosen to lead India for the third time in a row. But after 10 years in power, he was humbled at the national election. What kind of leader will he be? Stories from his youth in the Hindu nationalist movement offer clues. This episode draws on audio from the following publishers: Narendra Modi YouTube, ANI, Legend Global Studios, Lalit Vachani, Prasar Bharti Archives, Desh Gujarat, The New York Times, NDTV, Doordarshan and...

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One dam thing after another? Ukraine and reconstruction

When Russia attacked the Kakhovka dam in Ukraine a year ago, lives were lost, families stranded and towns submerged. But from that devastation emerged discussion on post-war reconstruction (https://www.economist.com/interactive/europe/2024/06/05/russias-explosion-of-a-huge-ukrainian-dam-had-surprising-effects). Our correspondent spent months investigating Narendra Modi (https://www.economist.com/audio/podcasts/the-modi-raj), the strongman who was...

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Labour’s pains: Britain’s growth problem

As Britain’s general-election campaign heats up, party leaders are vague on their economic plans (https://www.economist.com/britain/2024/06/03/can-britains-economy-grow-as-fast-as-it-needs-to). With growth so slow, how could the victor energise the economy? We visit the D-day beaches 80 years on, as war rages in Europe once again (10:19). And Venice’s new daytripper fee...

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Modi’s mess: a shock election result spells uncertainty for India

Narendra Modi, the strongman of India, will have to compromise now his party has lost its majority (https://www.economist.com/asia/2024/06/04/a-shock-election-result-in-india-humbles-narendra-modi). What does the surprise result mean for the country? As some foreign investors shy away from Africa, the continent’s private sector (https://www.economist.com/business/2024/05/23/africa-inc-is-ready-to-roar) is serving domestic customers to fill that...

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The big gag: Hong Kong’s crackdown on freedom

There has been a slow strangling of freedom (https://www.economist.com/china/2024/05/30/hong-kong-convicts-14-pro-democracy-activists?utm_campaign=a.io&utm_medium=audio.podcast.np&utm_source=theintelligence&utm_content=discovery.content.anonymous.tr_shownotes_na-na_article&utm_term=sa.listeners) in the territory where pro-democracy activists have been convicted; an annual vigil for the victims of the Tiananmen Square crackdown in...

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I, Claudia: Mexico’s new leader

Claudia Sheinbaum has been elected Mexico’s first female president (https://www.economist.com/leaders/2024/06/03/mexicos-new-president-must-do-a-high-stakes-u-turn?utm_campaign=a.io&utm_medium=audio.podcast.np&utm_source=theintelligence&utm_content=discovery.content.anonymous.tr_shownotes_na-na_article&utm_term=sa.listeners). Now the real fight begins: crime is rocketing, corruption is rampant and the country is divided. Hurricane...

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Choose this podcast: abortion and the election

In 2022 the Supreme Court gave control of abortion back to “the people and their elected representatives.” This November will be the greatest test yet of what that means. Democrats are running hard on the issue...

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Trump found guilty: what does this verdict mean?

Donald Trump is a convicted felon. Historic, yes. Game-changer? Probably not. Sign up to The Economist’s daily newsletter: https://econ.st/4bSCoWE Read more about the 2024 US elections: https://econ.st/4bF3q3X Read our leader on the verdict: https://econ.st/4dWFkDn Listen to our US podcast, “Checks and Balance”: https://econ.st/3yIkdo8

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Out on a ledger: Trump convicted

The former president was found guilty (https://www.economist.com/leaders/2024/05/30/the-disgrace-of-a-former-american-president?utm_campaign=a.io&utm_medium=audio.podcast.np&utm_source=theintelligence&utm_content=discovery.content.anonymous.tr_shownotes_na-na_article&utm_term=sa.listeners) on all 34 charges of falsifying business records. But his convictions leave lots of room for appeals, and for supporters to cry foul. South...

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Trailer: The Modi Raj

Narendra Modi may well be the most popular politician on the planet. India’s prime minister is eyeing a third term atop the world’s biggest democracy. A tea-seller’s son, Mr Modi began life an outsider and the man behind the political phenomenon remains hard to fathom. India has become an economic powerhouse during his ten years in charge. But he’s also the frontman for a chauvinistic Hindu nationalist dogma. Can Mr Modi continue to balance...

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The Intelligence: Rishi Sunak’s report card

Ahead of a general election (https://www.economist.com/leaders/2024/05/22/rishi-sunaks-election-call-makes-no-sense-but-is-good-news?utm_campaign=a.io&utm_medium=audio.podcast.np&utm_source=theintelligence&utm_content=discovery.content.anonymous.tr_shownotes_na-na_article&utm_term=sa.listeners) in July, we reflect on 14 years of Conservative rule. It’s not a great record, but will the prime minister be able to spin it on the...

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NATO’s boss wants to free Ukraine to strike inside Russia

NATO’s secretary-general, Jens Stoltenberg, has called on allies to lift restrictions on Ukraine’s use of NATO weapons inside Russian territory. Speaking to The Economist’s editor-in-chief, Zanny Minton Beddoes, Stoltenberg discussed in detail how the alliance can deal with the multiple threats Russia poses to global security—and prepare for a second Trump presidency.

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Who is “Europe’s last dictator”?

Four years ago Belarus’s dictator, Alexander Lukashenko, stole a presidential election. Belarusians have just voted again, in parliamentary and local polls. This time there was little chance of a repeat of the protests that followed the rigged vote in 2020. How has Mr Lukashenko tightened his grip? 00:00 - Why Lukashenko is called “Europe’s last dictator” 00:57 - How Lukashenko came to power 01:29 - Why Lukashenko is dependent on Putin Sign up to...

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Alexei Navalny, in his own words

The Economist interviewed Alexei Navalny, who has reportedly died in an Arctic penal colony, in the run-up to Russia’s 2018 presidential election. He discussed the breadth of his political support, his experiences in prison and offered some predictions for the future of Vladimir Putin’s Russia. 00:16 - The death of Navalny 00:41 - Navalny in prison 02:00 - Putin’s goals Sign up to The Economist’s daily newsletter: https://econ.st/3QAawvI Alexei...

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The life of Alexei Navalny

Alexei Navalny, Russia’s most prominent opposition leader, has died in a penal colony near the Arctic Circle, according to the Russian prison service. Listen to this excerpt on Navalny’s life and career from our podcast series “Next Year in Moscow”. Original podcast: Producers: Sam Colbert, Pete Naughton, Ksenia Barakovskaya, Lika Kremer; Sound design: Weidong Lin; Original music: Darren Ng; Executive producer: John Shields. 00:00 - Alexei...

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Indonesia’s election: who is Prabowo Subianto?

Prabowo Subianto, the frontrunner in Indonesia's election, hides a dark past. He has been accused of war crimes, overseeing the abduction of democracy activists and falsely declaring victory in two elections. Who is Prabowo and what does this election mean for the most powerful nation in South-East Asia? 00:00 - Who is Prabowo? 00:41 - Prabowo’s attitude to democracy 01:23 - What does this election mean for Indonesia? Sign up to The Economist’s...

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Israeli-Palestinian conflict: Is there a path to peace?

Things look bleak in the Middle East after Binyamin Netanyahu scorned America’s push for an end to the fighting. But in private he’s said to be more flexible. Could diplomacy actually work? 00:00 - The Saudi normalisation deal 00:42 - Israel and Saudi Arabia’s history 01:10 - How to solve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict 02:26 - Will the deal happen? Sign up to The Economist’s daily newsletter: https://econ.st/3QAawvI To read more on the...

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Is AI the future of movie-making?

What if text prompts enabled anyone to make a blockbuster movie, or even an entire box-set’s worth of TV? That is the promise of AI. This technology could one day prove as transformative to the movie business as sound, colour, or even the camera itself. Generative AI can already make videos in seconds which would normally take a visual-effects artist days to create. However it has yet to master photo-realistic video. The people at the forefront of...

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Why is crypto like a cockroach?

It’s really hard to kill cockroaches. Stamping on them, chopping off their head and even flushing them down the toilet won’t work. Much like cryptocurrency—an industry which, despite some recent setbacks, seems able to bounce back when you least expect it. 00:00 Why crypto is like cockroaches 00:25 Crypto is soaring 00:48 Why is crypto so hard to kill? Sign up to our weekly finance newsletter to keep up to date: https://econ.st/3P3zTG8 Listen...

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