Category Archive: 6b.) Mises.org

Feudalism and Cronyism in Machiavelli’s Italy

Although liberty is a recurring concern in Machiavelli’s writings, there is no consensus regarding either the definition of the concept or its relevance for his overall political thought.

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Mises Explains the Santa Claus Principle

The idea underlying all interventionist policies is that the higher income and wealth of the more affluent part of the population is a fund which can be freely used for the improvement of the conditions of the less prosperous. The essence of the interventionist policy is to take from one group to give to another. It is confiscation and distribution. Every measure is ultimately justified by declaring that it is fair to curb the rich for the benefit...

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The American Revolution Was a Culture War

Two hundred and forty-seven years ago this month, a group of American opponents of the Crown's tax policy donned disguises and set about methodically destroying a shipment of tea imported into Boston by the East India Company. The vandals trespassed on privately owned ships in Boston Harbor and threw the tea into the ocean.

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Individualism and the Industrial Revolution

Liberals stressed the importance of the individual. The 19th-century liberals already considered the development of the individual the most important thing. "Individual and individualism" was the progressive and liberal slogan. Reactionaries had already attacked this position at the beginning of the 19th century.

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What Is the Great Reset? Part I: Reduced Expectations and Bio-techno-feudalism

The Great Reset is on everyone’s mind, whether everyone knows it or not. It is presaged by the measures undertaken by states across the world in response to the covid-19 crisis. (I mean by “crisis” not the so-called pandemic itself, but the responses to a novel virus called SARS-2 and the impact of the responses on social and economic conditions.)

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It Should Shock Us That There’s Any Consumer Price Inflation at All

Thanks to lockdowns, high unemployment, and general uncertainty and fear over covid-19, the personal saving rate in the United States in October was 13.6 percent, the highest since the mid-1970s. This is down from April’s rate of 33.7 percent, which was the highest saving rate recorded since the Second World War.

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Trump’s NDAA Veto Threat Should Force a Conversation on Defense Spending

A dirty secret of congressional military spending is that when the government allocates billions in spending, unnecessary, wasteful, and parochial interests quickly find their way into the legislation. Original Article: "Trump’s NDAA Veto Threat Should Force a Conversation on Defense Spending". This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

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Episode 511: ‘The Imposers and the Imposed Upon’ w/ Jeff Deist

Jeff Deist is the president of the Mises Institute in Auburn, Alabama and former chief of staff to congressman Ron Paul.

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The US Money Supply Was up 37 Percent in November

In November, money supply growth rate was essentially unchanged from October and remains near September's all-time high. The stabilization we find in money-supply growth in recent months comes after eight months of record-breaking growth in the US which came in the wake of unprecedented quantitative easing, central bank asset purchases, and various stimulus packages.

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Entrepreneurial Empowerment: You Are Only as Good as Your Employees

As employees are increasingly recognized as an important source of ideas and inspiration, contemporary leadership research finds that the central task of leaders is to empower employees to realize their skills and talents to achieve an organizations’ visions and goals.

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What “Capitalism” Really Means

Descriptive terms which people use are often quite misleading. In talking about modern captains of industry and leaders of big business, for instance, they call a man a "chocolate king" or a "cotton king" or an "automobile king."

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New Lockdowns and More Regulations Are Disastrous for US Jobs

United States jobless claims have picked up, since the elections and the second wave of coronavirus have slowed down the economic recovery. Uncertainty about tax increases and changes in labor laws, including an increase in the minimum wage, add to the fear of new lockdowns, as employers see the devastating effects of these lockdowns in European employment.

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Why the Electoral College Matters

We begin to understand the electoral college when we admit the United States is really supposed to be a collection of member states, and not a single unified nation. Abolishing the EC is likely to worsen national conflict and disunity.

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The Skyscraper Curse: And How Austrian Economists Predicted Every Major Economic Crisis of the Last Century

The Skyscraper Curse: And How Austrian Economists Predicted Every Major Economic Crisis of the Last Centuryby Mark ThorntonAuburn, Ala.: Ludwig von Mises Institute, 2018. Michael Novak ([email protected]) is a Ph.D. student in entrepreneurship at Oklahoma State University. He also holds an MBA from the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater.

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Central Banks Put Wind at Bitcoin’s Back

“Russia, Russia, Russia,” the current president used to sarcastically chastise opponents for wondering about 2016 election tinkering from Putin’s principality. Recent MAGA rallies featured “Covid, covid, covid,” with President Trump complaining that the press could think of nothing else.

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Escaping Paternalism

Some economists, such as the 2017 Nobel Laureate Richard Thaler and his colleague Cass Sunstein, have proposed an unusual justification for government interference with people’s choices. They do not intend, they say, to override the preferences that people have. They don’t want to tell people what they “should” want, according to an external standard that people don’t accept.

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Climate Change Policy Isn’t Worth Its High Cost

In most economies, inventories are valued at market prices, while in China they are valued by the authorities and adjusted later. This is just one of many ways China manipulates GDP data.

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Introduction to the Entrepreneurship Special Issue

The Austrian school of economics has been all but left by the wayside in economics (e.g., Backhouse 2000). This fate, shared with all “heterodox” approaches that do not fully comply with mainstream dogma, means Austrian theory is at best discounted by other economists. More often, and typically, it is forgotten and a relic of the past.

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Murray N. Rothbard: Der freie Markt. Ein Segen, kein Fluch (Mises Karma 59)

Ein Auszug aus dem Kapitel „Back to the Jungle?“ aus dem Buch „Man, Economy, and State“ aus dem Jahre 1962 von Murray N. Rothbard. Aus dem Englischen übersetzt von Vincent Steinberg.

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Why GOP Loyalists and Candidates Keep Moving Left | Ryan McMaken

Unless the Left's opponents focus on changing voters' ideological drift to the left, candidates who want to actually win elections will have to keep moving left also.

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